Anime 
TL;DR
Baccano! Season 1 (2007)
バッカーノ! (Bakkāno!)

Synopsis

The series, often told from multiple points of view, is mostly set within a fictional United States during various time periods, most notably the Prohibition era. It focuses on various people, including alchemists, thieves, thugs, Mafiosi and Camorristi, who are unconnected to one another. After an immortality elixir is recreated in 1930 Manhattan, the characters begin to cross paths, setting off events that spiral further and further out of control.
Directed by
Written by
Screenplay by
Music by

Rating

  • The overall rating of the show.

Poor < Fair < Good < Great

Animation

  • Animation quality and consistency for that time. 

Poor < Fair < Good < Great

Story

  • How well the story flows and keeps you engaged.

Poor < Fair < Good < Great

Pros

Character design
Character development
Combat/Action
Dialogs
Music
Plot
Visual
World building

Cons

Confusing time jump

PROs CONS

Overview

Baccano! (Italian for “ruckus”, Italian pronunciation: [bakˈkaːno]) is a Japanese light novel series written by Ryōgo Narita and illustrated by Katsumi Enami.

The novels were adapted into a sixteen episode anime television series directed by Takahiro Omori and produced by Brain’s Base and Aniplex. The first thirteen episodes were aired on WOWOW from July 26, 2007, to November 1, 2007; the final three were released direct-to-DVD, which directly continue the story of the TV series.

Alternative title

– Baccano!
– Шумиха!
– バッカーノ!
– 바카노
– Murder Train
– Баккано!
– Рейвах!
– Шумиха!
– Шумотевица!
– باكانو

TL;DR Review

Baccano! is one of my favorite anime series. It started out extremely slow and confusing but will really pay off if you stick with it. From the same creator as Durarara!! (Ryōgo Narita), so if you like that series, you will definitely like this one. Please be aware Baccano! has a much darker tone than Durarara.

The animation is gorgeous and fluid. The colors are somewhat muted and tend to be darker.

If you like jazz music, you’ll love Baccano’s music. The anime mostly took place in the US around the prohibition period, so the music and time period blend well together. The ending song “Calling” by Kaori Oda is haunting and beautiful.

The series introduced so many characters at once, which can be confusing. As the series progress, you’ll learn more about each character and the story will make more sense.

I highly recommend this anime to everything, but please be aware this is intended for mature audiences. Baccano contains strong graphic violence and suggestive themes/dialogs. Intended for young adults.

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Featured Music

Baccano! Season 1 (2007)
Playlist

A collection of notable music and song from this series.

Music

Opening Theme

– “Gun’s & Roses” by Paradise Lunch

Closing Theme

– “Calling” by Kaori Oda
Play Video
Play Video
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Play Video

Featured Video

Baccano! Season 1 (2007)

A collection of notable videos, ranging from a fan-created trailer, music video, opening, and ending clip.

Claire Stanfield
"This world is mine. I think this world may even just be a long, long dream I'm watching. You guys may just be illusions, and it can't be proven whether or not you really exist either. In other words, this world was created with me at the center. So what will happen if I die? I don't know. My imagination isn't very creative; I just can't imagine myself dying. In other words, there is no way this world can completely disappear. But if I die, then everyone will disappear. I am the only one in this world who won't disappear. The rest are just people I see as if in a dream."
Jacuzzi Splot
"I might have cried a little too much up till now. So I've decided that the amount I cried counts towards you as well. I've cried your half. So even if bad things should happen now, don't cry."
Claire Stanfield
"So what if I'd spare him? In my mind it's the certainty in myself that I possess which allows me to have that kind of mercy or compassion. There's no wavering on that point. It's fixed like the stars. The fact is I'm never gonna be killed! So remember this: mercy and compassion are virtues that only the strong are privileged to possess. And I am strong."
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Credits

Photo

All images are copyright to their respective owners.

Photo by Nicolas LB, Jon Flobrant, and Yvette de Wit on Unsplash.

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