Anime 
TL;DR
Ponyo (2008)
崖の上のポニョ (Gake no Ue no Ponyo)

Synopsis

A young boy, Sousuke, befriends a strange looking goldfish whom he names Ponyo. Unbeknownst to Sousuke, Ponyo is a magic fish who has decided that she wants to live with Sousuke and the other humans. Unfortunately, Ponyo’s decision to give up her underwater life creates a crack in an ancient magic spell and places the world in danger. Together, Sousuke and Ponyo must set things right.
Directed by
Written by
Screenplay by
Music by

Rating

  • The overall rating of the show.

Poor < Fair < Good < Great

Animation

  • Animation quality and consistency for that time. 

Poor < Fair < Good < Great

Story

  • How well the story flows and keeps you engaged.

Poor < Fair < Good < Great

Pros

Character design
Visual

Cons

PROs CONS

Overview

Ponyo is the eighth film Miyazaki directed for Ghibli and his tenth overall. The film was released in Japan on July 19, 2008, in Southeast Asia on January 1, 2009, in the United States and Canada on August 14, 2009, and in the United Kingdom and Ireland on February 12, 2010.

Alternative titles

– Gake no Ue no Ponyo
– Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea
– 崖の上のポニョ
– Küçük Deniz Kızı Ponyo
– Ponyo – Das grosse Abenteuer am Meer
– Ponyo ant uolos prie jūros
– Ponyo mäe otsas
– Ponyo på klippan vid havet
– Ponyo rantakalliolla
– Ponyo sulla scogliera
– Ponyo sur la falaise
– Ponyo z útesu nad mořem
– Ponyo à Beira-Mar
– Ponyo: Uma Amizade que Veio do Mar
– Рыбка Поньо на утесе
– פוניו על הצוק ליד הים
– Ponyo
– Ponyo en el Acantilado
– Ponyo på klippen ved havet
– Ponyo y el secreto de la Sirenita
– 崖上的波妞
– Ponyo – Das große Abenteuer am Meer
– Ponyo On A Cliff
– Ponyo das verzauberte Goldfischmädchen
– Ponyo na klifie
– Рыбка Поньо на утёсе

TL;DR Review

Ponyo (Japanese: 崖の上のポニョ Hepburn: Gake no Ue no Ponyo, literally “Ponyo on the Cliff”), initially titled in English and released in Asia as Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea, is a 2008 Japanese animated fantasy film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki, animated by Studio Ghibli. This is another fish out of water story, literally.

The art style for Ponyo has that astonishing child-like feel to it, from the crayon textures of the background to the unrealistic and cartoonish physic of the world. The animation is wonderful and playful.

The movie has that naive innocent to it, where the perspective is from a kid point of view. In this surreal world, adults take what 5-years-old said at face value and leave them to their device during a flood. The sense of empowerment a child has seemed unbelievable.

I also find it odd that Sosuke addresses his father and mother by their name instead of the traditional title (Otosan and Okasan). Sosuke is also the most matured 5-year-old I’ve ever seen. Again this could be due to how the story may be from Sosuke point of view where reality may not be reliable.

The final test makes little sense to me. The trial is to see if Sosuke truly love Ponyo but as a 5-year-old, their love is already pure and innocent so not sure how that is in any doubt.

I recommend this movie for a parent to watch with their, or someone else, children. It is enjoyable enough for everyone in the family. Though I like the movie, it is not something I need to watch a second time. Ponyo is family-friendly and appropriate for everyone.

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Music

Opening Theme

– “Umi no Okaasan” by 林正子

Closing Theme

– “Gake no Ue no Ponyo” by Fujimaki Naoya, Fujioka Fujimaki, Oohashi Nozomi

Insert/Image Theme

– “Fujimoto no Theme” by Fujioka Fujimaki
– “Himawari no Ie no Rondo” by Mai
– “Hontou no Kimochi” by Fujioka Fujimaki
– “Imouto-tachi” by Little Carol
– “Ponyo no Komoriuta” by Oohashi Nozomi
– “Umi no Okaasan”

Credits

Photo

All images are copyright to their respective owners.

Photo by Nicolas LB, Jon Flobrant, and Yvette de Wit on Unsplash.

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